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Monthly Display - December 2017
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Interacting Shapes Abstract 1


160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

A small series of rectangles applied with the 'exclusive-or' mode. Any overlapping of the shapes results in a negative shape.

 

 

 

Interacting Shapes Abstract 2


160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

A small series of rectangles applied with the 'exclusive-or' mode. Any overlapping of the shapes results in a negative shape.

 

 

 

 

Interacting Shapes Abstract 3


160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

 

 

 

 

Interacting Shapes Abstract 4


160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

Lots of reversing tones from intersecting shapes and lines, and some rectangles of 'pattern tone'.

 

 

 

Interacting Shapes Abstract 5


160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

Lots of reversing tones from intersecting shapes and lines.

 

 

 

Interacting Shapes Abstract 6


320 x 352 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

Lots of reversing tones from intersecting shapes and lines.

 

Detail, as it appeared:

 

 

 

 

 

Concentric Circles Produced by the Machine Code Routine


320 x 352 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

The machine code routine used for producing the circles is based on Bresenham's Circle Algorithm. The aspect ratio can be modified to produce ovals. With the way that the lines jump from one pixel row or column to the next, this image contains a number of interesting patterns as part of the way the circles are produced.

 

Double-sized Version:

 

 

 

Concentric Circles Abstract


160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.
 

 

Interacting Shapes Abstract 7

160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

 

 

 

 

Interacting Shapes Abstract 8


160 x 176 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

This design, to me, feels like it represents a motorbike.

 

 

 

 

Random Lines


320 x 352 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

Produced using the included machine code routines.

 

 

Double-sized Version:


 

 

 

 

 

Sierpinski Gasket


320 x 352 pixels, produced on a Vic-20 computer.

This interesting figure is the result of starting with plotting a pixel between 3 points of a triangle, then repeating the process of randomly choosing one of the triangle points and plotting a pixel halfway towards that chosen triangle point. I set up my program to continue the above repeated process until I pressed the space bar. This idea came from the Polish mathematician Waclaw Sierpinski, as described in the book, "Chaos" by James Gleick (published by Cardinal, Sphere Books, London, UK, 1988).

 

 

Double-sized Version:


 

 


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Monthly Display - December 2017
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