Prev
Monthly Display - February 2018
Next

 

The Lunar Eclipse Experienced on 31st January 2018 - page 2

When I viewed the eclipse on the computer program, 'Stellarium', it gave images like the one below. The softly edged brown shape of Earth's shadow was indicated, but it didn't look like the real eclipse. I wanted to improve on the images captured from Stellarium.

 

 

I firstly collected the images I wanted from Stellarium, basically taken every 15 minutes, from 10:15 pm. I then went about trying to calculate the size of Earth's shadows (full and partial), based on the diagram below, but also collecting data (such as Earth's diameter, distance to the sun, etc., from the book, "Muirden, J. Pocket Book of Astronomy. Kingfisher Books, London, 1987).

 

 

 

 

 

I used the equations derived above, along with measurements for things such as the diameter of the Earth and the Moon, taken from the book, "Muirden, J. Pocket Book of Astronomy. Kingfisher Books, London, 1987, to create the spreadsheet below. Note that at this time of the year, the Earth is close to its minimal orbitting distance from the sun, and because the moon is a super moon, its orbit distance from the Earth is close to its minimal orbitting distance.


The Moon Rising Above the Adelaide Hills

 

 

 

 

I used the original captures from Stellarium (with the positions of the stars in the background), and replaced the image of the moon with the image of the 'super moon' that I had taken in 2016. The moon face does rotate slowly throughout the span of the frames, and this rotation was applied to the new moon face. The shadow of the earth was then applied from a soft red-brown shape that was appropriately sized from the equations above, and blurred.

This sequence was calculated for the view from Adelaide, in South Australia.

 

Lunar eclipse on 10/12/11.
Previous image
Next image

Image:

(You can enter 0-14 and press the tab key to go directly to that image)
The following buttons may not work, depending on your internet connection speed, and whether the images have been cached.

 


I was pleased with the better sense of full moon brightness I achieved, compared with the images taken directly from Stellarium.

 

 

It is interesting to compare the frames from the Stellarium sequence with the photographs I took. Firstly, here is the frame from 11:30 pm:


 

 

 

 

 

Here is the frame from 11:45 pm, with the photograph I took at 11:45 pm:


 

 

 


It is interesting to compare the positions of the darker lava plains (or maria) with the real photographs (almost identical). The calculations that are done in Stellarium for the positions and orientations of the large bodies, are obviously very close to the real thing.

There is something very special about experiencing the event for real.

 


Prev
Monthly Display - February 2018
Next