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View Through the Adelaide Hills


View Through the Adelaide Hills
29.5 cm (w) x 21 cm (h), black biro on cartridge paper.
Date produced: 24th March 2000

This was drawn on-site, on the side of Greenhill Road, up in the Adelaide Hills. I was keen to express the forms seen within this view, with large interlocking masses. Beyond the hills are the Adelaide Plains and then the sea. This is a large view that (I find) feels fabulous to enjoy when one is really there.

The 3-dimensional nature of the view is a very important part of enjoying this view (and in enjoying most views). Much of this comes from having stereo vision - viewing the world through two eyes, providing the brain with slightly different views that are then processed to give us a very powerful perception of form and space. This powerful perception of form and space is even more powerful as we move through space (such as when we walk, or enjoy the view from inside a moving vehicle). It’s during such movements in space, that makes me realise just how quickly our brains can process this information. From my experiments into stereo photography, I have realised that an accurate sense of 3-dimensional space and form only occurs if both images are perfectly synchronised - that is, both the left eye information and right eye information are seen at exactly the same time. How is this achieved by our bodies? How can our brain process both the images coming from our eyes at exactly the same time (and do this type of processing seemingly continuously)? Remarkable!

You can see the importance of the 3-dimensional space in a landscape when you view back a photograph of the same landscape. They lack the ‘feel’ of the real landscape. A photo of a flat open desert is a good example. You don’t get to feel the size and vast space that is out there. There might be some indications though.

Producing flat 2-dimensional images means that the 3-dimensional spaces can only be indicated, or expressed using things like perspective drawing, the inclusion of ‘relative sizes’, the use of regular grids, or perhaps relationships of colours. Real 3-dimensional spaces and forms can’t really be created on a single flat image. Much of the work in interpreting 3-dimensional space and form from a flat image has to be done by the viewer. For that to happen, I believe that an artist has to provide enough information and enough incentive to encourage viewers to make that effort.

I’ve used grids here to help express the forms experienced.

The outer edge of one of the main roads through the hills can be seen along the bottom of the drawing (it is largely obscured by the top of the cliff I’m standing on). This road then winds around the side of this large land mass, and can be seen running around the mass on the right of the view through to the sea.

 

 

 

Detail 1:

View Through the Adelaide Hills - Detail 1

 

 

 

 

Detail 2:

View Through the Adelaide Hills - Detail 2

 

 


 

Another related artwork:

 

Weeping Myrtle 3


Weeping Myrtle 3
21 cm (w) x 29.5 cm (h), black biro and watercolour pencils on acid-free cartridge paper.
Date produced: 12th September 2002

Drawn on-site, near home. Here, I wanted to draw the twisting, meandering, tubular forms within this Weeping Myrtle trunk (growing by the side of the road within suburbia). The movements of form within the trunk’s forms are very expressive of being part of an old watercourse.

The colour work, done using high quality watercolour pencils, was added to reinforce the expression of forms and the expression of space around the forms. Surfaces that are close to me have been coloured to be more orange. Pale blues have been applied to indicate the air that sits behind forms.

 

 

 

Larger Image:

Weeping Myrtle 3

 

 

 

Detail 1:

Weeping Myrtle 3 - Detail 1

 

 

 

 

Detail 2:

Weeping Myrtle 3 - Detail 2

 

 

 

 

Detail 3:

Weeping Myrtle 3 - Detail 3

 

 

 

 

Detail 4:

Weeping Myrtle 3 - Detail 4

 

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