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Monthly Display - August 2018

 

The Red Letter-box


4032 x 3024 pixels, digital photograph.
Taken 28th February 2016, 12:23 pm, using ISO 100.

The next step in improving the accuracy of my photographs involves using on-site recordings done with pastels. I started a pastel of this scene (a photograph of the pastel is shown below) based on recording accurate colours and tones from direct observation. I also photographed the scene from the same position as I used for producing the pastel, to look at how the photograph captured the colours and tones. I was keen to try to manipulate the photograph to see whether I could get something that was closer to the observed scene. I was hoping that there would be some generalised manipulations that could be applied to any photographs taken of sunlit scenes, to improve their accuracy. The photograph above looks darker in the mid-tones, and the highlights didn't have the amount of yellow green that I recorded in the pastel.

 

35 cm x 27 cm, pastels on paper.

The pastel was done over 3 sessions of about an hour and a half per session, at the same time of the day (actually the 3 days I worked on the pastel spanned about 4 weeks). It is interesting to see the differences in colour and tone between this pastel and the photograph, shown above. One was done using the human eye, and the other was done using a CMOS sensor, transposed using software. I went back to the photograph and looked at various manipulations to get a closer result to the pastel recording.

 

4032 x 3024 pixels, digital photograph.
Taken 28th February 2016, 12:23 pm, using ISO 100.
Manipulated using Adobe Camera Raw and Adobe Photoshop Elements.

I am happy that this photograph is a lot more accurate than the originally processed photograph from the top of the page. It did require a lot of work that was only possible because I had the pastel to refer to. Unfortunately, a lot of the foliage lit up in the sunlight is losing the colour differences that showed in the original photograph, because their colours have been largely pushed towards yellow green. However, if you try hard enough, you can discern some differences in the foliage colours.

Overall, though, this process highlights the importance of being able to make some accurate on-site recordings of colour and tone (and these on-site recordings do require considerable management and time to produce).

 

Detail 1:



Detail 2:

 


Detail 3:

 

 

 


End of this month's display.

 


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Monthly Display - August 2018